Can You be Compelled to Pay Fines?

The following is just one of many letters we get that demonstrate Aussies are fed up with the Corporate political party dictatorship.

Before acting to resist the dictatorship make sure you know how Common Law works, and how to stop the constant barrage of fines the criminals and traitors keep imposing in an attempt to bankrupt us. Little do they realize that all they are doing is making Aussies very, very angry, and when that anger boils over the politicians, judges police and bureaucrats had better find some very deep, dark holes to hide in. But that won’t help them. The Australian people are fed up, and when we all get angry we take action to stop it.

Make sure you read these laws that protect our Common Law Rights:

This is what one very angry Aussie has written to the Queensland fine enforcement company and the Queensland Electoral Commissioner. We reproduce his letter complete with emphasis as received.

And remember, every time you vote for the criminals and traitors you continue to give them permission to dictate your very lives.


Why is the AEC registered to a farm in Victoria?

Dear Bill (the Queensland Electoral Commissioner), and the Administration of SPER.

Thank you for your email.

What is my true bill?

Is it according to the Australian Constitution 1900 and 1901 under Chapter V section 115, which states;

“A State shall not coin money, nor make anything but gold and silver coin a legal tender in payment”.

Also, the Currency Exchange Act 1965 which states the following;

Part IV—Legal tender

16 Legal tender

             (1)  A tender of payment of money is a legal tender if it is made in coins that are made and issued under this Act and are of current weight:

                     (a)  in the case of coins of the denomination of Five cents, Ten cents, Twenty cents or Fifty cents or coins of 2 or more of those denominations—for payment of an amount not exceeding $5 but for no greater amount;

                     (b)  in the case of coins of the denomination of One cent or Two cents or coins of both of those denominations—for payment of an amount not exceeding 20 cents but for no greater amount;

                     (c)  in the case of coins of a denomination greater than Fifty cents but less than Ten dollars—for payment of an amount not exceeding 10 times the face value of a coin of the denomination concerned but for no greater amount;

 Is my true bill $20.00 according to law as mentioned above.

If not, I deem your intentions and SPER’s as an act of treason due to complete disregard of the Australian Commonwealth Constitution 1900 and 1901.

It seems that you remain staunch to enforce the fines determined by SPER, so, I will redress my protest.

Why is the AEC registered to an address for a puppy farm in rural Victoria?

Your law, according to the Electoral Act 1992 under section 186 (1) (a).

I strongly believe this act is invalid due to the following Fact.

Attached above is the document 18-k which identifies Queensland State Government Annual Report 2018 as a Registered Corporation on the United States Securities and Exchange Commission.

The document 18-k proves, without doubt, that Queensland State Government is nothing more than a gloried corporation and therefore has NO Jurisdiction to enforce any laws on any free person.

To strengthen my argument and to demonstrate that this is no fluke, I have also attached a copy of NSW and the Commonwealth of Australia’s document detailed as 18-k Annual Report as registered corporations on the Securities and Exchange Commission.

The attachments above proves beyond doubt that Queensland, New South Wales and the Commonwealth are fake governments.

Therefore, how can you enforce legislature of a presumptuous government?

When or what year was the referendum to register Queensland State Government on the global financial market?

Further, because the legislature of Queensland and the Commonwealth are tarnished (invalid) due to both being private corporations.

I will address my case further according to Imperial law, International Law and my own Customary Law, known as Malo’s Gelar which has governed Meriam Nations for 60 thousand years +.

My tribe’s common law is still practiced today, and its significance was clearly recognised in the Mabo High Court decision of 1992.

Imperial Law according to the Magna Carta 1215 article 61.

Your enforcement of the Electoral Act 1992, section 186 (1) (a), contradicts and breaches the Magna Carta which is the spine of the Commonwealth Constitution 1900 and 1901, which states as follows;

We have a right to enter into lawful rebellion if we feel we are being governed unjustly. Contrary to common belief our Sovereign and her government is only there to govern us and not to rule us and this must be done in the constraint of our common law and the freedoms asserted to us by such law, nothing can become law in this country if it falls out of this simple constraint.

I boycotted the 2017 election as I felt it was my God Given Right to protest of the deceitful act of the State entrapment of Deeds of Grant in Trust and cancellation of Reserve Status, 1912-2012 exactly 100 yrs as reserve status was due for renewal or sovereignty claim of Murray Island.

They cheated Meriam Nations into DOGIT.

International Law according to the International Covenant on Civil and political Rights. Details as follows;

Article 1

1. All peoples have the right of self-determination. By virtue of that right they freely determine their political status and freely pursue their economic, social and cultural development.

Article 2

1. Each State Party to the present Covenant undertakes to respect and to ensure to all individuals within its territory and subject to its jurisdiction the rights recognized in the present Covenant, without distinction of any kind, such as race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status.

2. Where not already provided for by existing legislative or other measures, each State Party to the present Covenant undertakes to take the necessary steps, in accordance with its constitutional processes and with the provisions of the present Covenant, to adopt such laws or other measures as may be necessary to give effect to the rights recognized in the present Covenant.

3. Each State Party to the present Covenant undertakes:

(a) To ensure that any person whose rights or freedoms as herein recognized are violated shall have an effective remedy, notwithstanding that the violation has been committed by persons acting in an official capacity;

b) To ensure that any person claiming such a remedy shall have his right thereto determined by competent judicial, administrative or legislative authorities, or by any other competent authority provided for by the legal system of the State, and to develop the possibilities of judicial remedy;

(c) To ensure that the competent authorities shall enforce such remedies when granted.

Article 3

The States Parties to the present Covenant undertake to ensure the equal right of men and women to the enjoyment of all civil and political rights set forth in the present Covenant.

Article 5

1. Nothing in the present Covenant may be interpreted as implying for any State, group or person any right to engage in any activity or perform any act aimed at the destruction of any of the rights and freedoms recognized herein or at their limitation to a greater extent than is provided for in the present Covenant.

Article 18

1. Everyone shall have the right to freedom of thoughtconscience and religion. This right shall include freedom to have or to adopt a religion or belief of his choice, and freedom, either individually or in community with others and in public or private, to manifest his religion or belief in worship, observance, practice and teaching.

2. No one shall be subject to coercion which would impair his freedom to have or to adopt a religion or belief of his choice.(i.e. compulsory voting)

3. Freedom to manifest one’s religion or beliefs may be subject only to such limitations as are prescribed by law and are necessary to protect public safety, order, health, or morals or the fundamental rights and freedoms of others.

Article 19

1. Everyone shall have the right to hold opinions without interference.

2. Everyone shall have the right to freedom of expression; this right shall include freedom to seek, receive and impart information and ideas of all kinds, regardless of frontiers, either orally, in writing or in print, in the form of art, or through any other media of his choice.

Article 26

All persons are equal before the law and are entitled without any discrimination to the equal protection of the law. In this respect, the law shall prohibit any discrimination and guarantee to all persons equal and effective protection against discrimination on any ground such as race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinionnational or social origin, property, birth or other status.

Article 27

In those States in which ethnic, religious or linguistic minorities exist, persons belonging to such minorities shall not be denied the right, in community with the other members of their group, to enjoy their own culture, to profess and practice their own religion, or to use their own language.

Malo’s Gelar (Meriam Customary Law, rule 9 of 24) states as follows;

“Malo muiar, kemer kemer, muiar”.

As you see, SPER and your Department has clearly breached Imperial Law in Magna Carta, International Law according to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and Malo’s Law which is my own peoples Common Law as recognized in High Court-Mabo 1992.

Furthermore, where in the Commonwealth Constitution 1900 & 1901 is the mention of powers given to all the States since Federation. Or the authority of the State of Queensland to act as a Sovereign State to register and trade as a corporation on the United States Securities and Exchange Commission? (without referendum)

This is treason according to the Australian Constitution 1900 & 1901.

I bring to your attention another concerning factor, your departments demands and that of SPER for me to pay the fines is a direct act of “deliberate extortion” and “blackmail”.

Following is from your email

There are two ways for the matter to be dealt with from here.

  • You may pay the outstanding penalty (including fees added by the State Penalties Enforcement Registry – SPER).
  • You can provide in written form a ’valid and sufficient’ reason for failing to vote. The reasons provided below do not constitute a valid and sufficient reason.

On the date of 14/12/12 I lost my homeland (Murray Island) back to the fake State of Queensland after my peers spent 10 years in High Court 1982-1992 and you state that it does not constitute a valid and sufficient reason.

I say, “FUCK YOU”.

Below are the SPER’s threat according to the State Penalties Act 1999;

While your correspondence is noted, the content does not negate your liability to finalise the debt(s).

The options available are:

1.       Payment in full using the attached Debt Schedule;

2.       Apply for a payment arrangement by direct debit or eligible Centrelink benefit;

If you fail to take up one of these options, SPER may commence enforcement

action as permitted under the Act:

·         Driver Licence Suspension;

·         Fine Collection Notice (to redirect money from a bank account or employer);

·         Registration of Interest over property;

·         Vehicle Immobilisation;

·         Seizure and Sale of property; and

·         Arrest and Imprisonment Warrant.

All of the above are extortion and blackmail threats.

Therefore, it is my will that you demonstrate that the Electoral Act 1992, section 186 (1) (a) is valid as I have demonstrated that Queensland State Government is registered as a corporation in a foreign country.

It is also my will that SPER, also demonstrate that the State Penalties Act 1999 is valid today, considering above mentioned and attached documents.

In closing, definitions of extortion and blackmail from Blacks Law Dictionary;

EXTORT.

To compel or coerce, as a confession or information by any means serving to overcome one’s power of resistance, or making the confession or admission involuntary. Sutton v. Commonwealth, 207 Ky. 597, 269 S.W. 754, 757.

To gain by wrongful methods, to obtain in an unlawful manner, to compel payments by means of threats of injury to person, property, or reputation. McKenzie v. State, 113 Neb. 576, 204 N.W. 60, 61; State v. Richards, 97 Wash. 587, 167 P. 47, 48.

To take from unlawfully; to exact something wrongfully by threats or putting in fear. State v. Adams, Del., 106 A. 287, 288, 7 Boyce, 335. See Extortion. (i.e. suspension of D/L)

To wrest from, to exact, to take under a claim of protection. Commonwealth v. Neubauer, 142 Pa.Super. 528, 16 A.2d 450, 452.

The natural meaning of the word “extort” is to obtain money or other valuable thing either by compulsion,by actual force, or by the force of motives applied to the will, and often more overpowering and irresistible than physical force. Com. v. O’Brien, 12 Cush., Mass., 90.

EXTORTIO EST CRIMEN QUANDO QUIS COLORE OFFICH EXTORQUET QUOD NON EST DEBITUM, VEL SUPRA DEBITUIVI, VEL ANTE TEMPUS QUOD EST DEBITUM. 10 Coke, 102.

Extortion is a crime when, by color of office, any person extorts that which is not due, or more than is due, or before the time when it is due.

EXTORTION.

Unlawful obtaining of money from another. People v. Parkinson, 181 Misc. 603, 41 N.Y.S.2d 331, 334.

It has also been defined as corrupt demanding or receiving by a person in office of a fee for services which should be performed gratuitously; or, where compensation is permissible, of a larger fee than the law justifies, or a fee not 696 EXTRA due, (Magna Carta rings a bell)

2 Bish.Crim.Law, § 390; exaction of .money by reason of oppressive conditions or circumstances, People v. Weller, 237 N.Y. 316, 143 N.E. 205, 208, 38 A.L.R. 613;

BLACKMAIL.

The extortion of money by threats or overtures towards criminal prosecution or the destruction of a man’s reputation or social standing. In common parlance, the term is equivalent to and synonymous with, “extortion,”—the exaction of money, either for the performance of a duty, the prevention of an injury, or the exercise of an influence.

It supposes the service to be unlawful, and the payment involuntary.

Not infrequently it is extorted by threats, or by operating upon the fears or the credulity, or by promises to conceal, or offers to expose, the weaknesses, the follies, or the crimes of the victim. Mitchell v. Sharon, C.C.Cal., 51 F. 424; In re Mills, 104 Wash. 278, 176 P. 556, 562.

In closing, please send a copy of the true bill as the information I have received are corporate statements.

I look forward to your court action in which I will counter challenge on the grounds of extortion and blackmail and table all documents above and others to justify my protest to boycott the 2017 elections.

I wait your response within 14 days as per government charter.

Angry

William XXXX


Who is SPER (State Penalties Enforcement Registry)?

SPER tries to present as a faceless entity to us, but we have done some research and found the names and addresses of the people who run SPER. Notice that they are all elected MP’s. This is a massive conflict of interest.

This body of people is responsible for enforcing all fines issued in Queensland. All other states have a similar enforcement body. You are encouraged to do your own research to find out who they are.

NOTE: The State Parliamentary Acts they refer to below are statutory Acts that have no force, as they have all been passed without Crown Authority, as required by the Commonwealth of Australia Constitution Act 1901. An Act passed without Crown Authority is no Act at all.

SPER Economic and Governance Committee

Chair, Deputy Chair & Members:

1.         Linus Power MP, Member for Logan – ALP

            1-3 Helen Street, Hillcrest 4115

            Phone (07) 3445 2100
            Email logan@parliament.qld.gov.au

2.         Ray Stevens MP, Member for Mermaid Beach – LNP

            2434 Gold Coast Highway MERMAID BEACH QLD 4218

            Phone: (07) 5600 0100
            Mermaid.Beach@parliament.qld.gov.au

3.         Nikki Boyd MP, Member for Pine Rivers – ALP

            Shop 5A, 199 Gympie Road STRATHPINE QLD 4500

            Phone: (07) 3448 3100
            Email Pine.Rivers@parliament.qld.gov.au

4.         Sam O’Connor MP, Member for Bonney – LNP

            102 Imperial Parade, Labrador QLD 4214

            Phone (07) 5657 7980
            Email bonney@parliament.qld.gov.au

5.         Dan Purdie MP, Member for Ninderry – LNP

            11 Heathfield Road COOLUM BEACH QLD 4573

            Phone  (07) 5406 7900
            Email ninderry@parliament.qld.gov.au

6.         Kim Richards MP, Member for Redlands – ALP

            Tenancy H20, Victoria Point Lakeside
            11-27 Bunker Road VICTORIA POINT QLD 4165


           
Phone: (07) 3446 0100
            Email: Redlands@parliament.qld.gov.au

7.         Parliament House Contact details

            Post Parliament House
            Brisbane, Queensland, 4000

            Phone: 07 3553 6637
            Email: egc@parliament.qld.gov.au
            Web: www.parliament.qld.gov.au/egc

Economics and Governance Committee
Report No. 14, 56th Parliament
Subordinate legislation tabled between 2 May 2018 and 15 May 2018

Introduction

Role of the committee

The Economics and Governance Committee (the committee) is a portfolio committee of the Legislative Assembly.1 The committee’s primary areas of responsibility include:

  • Premier and Cabinet, and Trade
  • Treasury, and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Partnerships
  • Local Government, Racing and Multicultural Affairs.

The committee is responsible for examining each item of subordinate legislation in its portfolio area to consider the policy to be given effect by the legislation, the application of fundamental legislative principles, and the lawfulness of the legislation.2

Aim of this report

This report summarises the committee’s examination of subordinate legislation tabled between 2 May 2018 and 15 May 2018. It reports on any identified fundamental legislative principle issues and the explanatory notes’ compliance with the Legislative Standards Act 1992.

Subordinate legislation considered

The committee considered the following subordinate legislation.

SL No. Subordinate legislation Tabled date Disallowance date
51 of 2018 State Penalties Enforcement Amendment (Postponement) Regulation 2018 15 May 2018 19 September 2018
52 of 2018 State Penalties Enforcement (Hardship and Safeguards) Amendment Regulation 2018 15 May 2018 19 September 2018

1 2

Parliament of Queensland Act 2001, s 88 and Standing Order 194. Parliament of Queensland Act 2001, s 93.

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SL 51 of 2018 – State Penalties Enforcement Amendment (Postponement) Regulation 2018

The purpose of State Penalties Enforcement Amendment (Postponement) Regulation 2018 (the regulation) is to delay the period before automatic commencement of the provisions of the State Penalties Enforcement Amendment Act 2017 (Amendment Act) that have not commenced to the end of 19 May 2019.

The regulation will enable the un-commenced provisions to be commenced by proclamation concurrently with the implementation of elements of State Penalties Enforcement Registry’s (SPER’s) new service model which the provisions support.

The Amendment Act received assent on 19 May 2017. The Amendment Act supports the implementation of a new service delivery model for the SPER to modernise the management of penalty debts in Queensland. The provisions of the Amendment Act facilitate this new model by providing improved non-monetary debt finalisation options for people experiencing hardship, enabling case management of debtors by SPER, establishing fairer fee arrangements, creating efficiencies in the management of disputes and delivering improvements to SPER’s enforcement functions.

The new SPER service delivery model is being implemented through a staged approach throughout 2017 and 2018.3 To support this approach, the Amendment Act provides that the legislation commences by proclamation, with the exception of a small number of provisions that commenced on assent. Provisions of the Amendment Act which deliver improved non-monetary debt finalisation options for people experiencing hardship through the introduction of a work and development order scheme commenced by proclamation on 4 December 2017.

Most of the Amendment Act provisions have not yet commenced, and therefore would have automatically commenced on 20 May 2018, unless postponed by regulation. The regulation enables commencement of the provisions which support specific elements of the new service model to coincide with implementation of each of those elements by SPER.

The regulation will provide for the automatic commencement of the remaining Amendment Act provisions on 20 May 2019, unless the provisions are commenced by proclamation prior to this date.

Committee comment

The committee sought additional information from Queensland Treasury in relation to the implementation of provisions of the State Penalties Enforcement Amendment Act 2017.

On the provisions that have not as yet been proclaimed, Queensland Treasury advised the committee that they will commence in accordance with the implementation of the new SPER model. Queensland Treasury stated:

Implementation of the SPER service delivery model anticipates commencement of most of the provisions in Quarter 2 of this financial year. However, this timing will continue to be based on the readiness of the business model. The key elements of the SPER model to which those changes relate are case management of debtors, consistent fee arrangements, payment plans and arrangements for the registration of debts with SPER. Provisions relating to management of disputes under the cancellation of enforcement order process will commence in accordance with an implementation schedule that provides sufficient time for SPER and affected agencies to implement the changes.4

Queensland Treasury provided the committee with a timetable of commencement of provisions of the State Penalties Enforcement Amendment Act 2017.5 The timetable of commencement provisions is provided at Appendix A.

3 Explanatory notes, p 1.
4 Queensland Treasury, correspondence dated 12 September 2018. 5 Queensland Treasury, correspondence dated 12 September 2018.

Economics and Governance Committee 2

The committee is satisfied with the implementation schedule as provided by Queensland Treasury and identified no issues regarding completion of commencement by the required legislative timeframe of 19 May 2019, as set by the Regulation.

The committee identified no issues regarding consistency with fundamental legislative principles or the lawfulness of the State Penalties Enforcement Amendment (Postponement) Regulation 2018.

The committee notes that the explanatory notes comply with the Legislative Standards Act 1992.
SL 52 of 2018 – State Penalties Enforcement (Hardship and Safeguards) Amendment

Regulation 2018

The State Penalties Enforcement (Hardship and Safeguards) Amendment Regulation 2018 (the amending regulation) amends the State Penalties Enforcement Regulation 2014 to achieve the following objectives:

  • define the meaning of specific terms used in the provisions of the State Penalties Enforcement Act 1999 (the Act) relating to work and development orders including ‘remote area’, ‘mental illness’, and ‘substance use disorder’
  • outline the supporting evidence that an approved sponsor is required to consider as part of an eligibility assessment for a person who is unable to pay their SPER debt because the person has a substance use disorder
  • provide details of the activities that may be undertaken under a work and development order, such as unpaid work, medical treatment, courses and programs, including any restrictions that apply to these activities and the amount by which particular activities satisfy SPER debts
  • specify the minimum amount that must be retained in a debtor’s account and the maximum administrative charge that can be imposed when a financial institution makes a deduction under a fine collection notice issued by SPER for the redirection of monies held in a debtor’s financial institution account
  • identify specific circumstances in which the registrar of SPER may waive or return fees payable by a debtor, such as when a debtor has incurred a SPER fee because they were unable to pay an infringement notice fine due to financial hardship
  • expressly authorise that all documents issued under the Act may be served to postal addresses, and
  • update the references to sections of the Act which were altered as a result of the commencement of provisions of the State Penalties Enforcement Amendment Act 2017 (Amendment Act).6

Committee comment

The committee notes the amending regulation provides for the definition of certain terms: ‘remote area’, ‘mental illness’, and ‘substance abuse disorder’.7 There appear to be no issues with fundamental legislative principles concerning the definitions themselves, apart from one potential issue in relation to the term ‘substance use disorder’.

Proposed section 19AC prescribes that a ‘substance use disorder’, for the purposes of eligibility to undertake a work and development order, means a substance use disorder estimated as ‘moderate to severe’ under the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) published by the American Psychiatric Association.8

The use of the DSM-5 for this definition raises the issue of whether the amending regulation shows sufficient regard to the institution of Parliament, by allowing the sub-delegation of power delegated

6 Explanatory notes, p 2.
7 State Penalties Enforcement (Hardship and Safeguard) Amendment Regulation 2018, s 5, insertion of new pt 5A. 8 Explanatory notes, p 4.

Economics and Governance Committee 3

by an Act only in appropriate cases and to appropriate persons. This is because the amending regulation is defining a term in the legislation by way of an external document that is not incorporated by the legislation.

The amending regulation does not seek to incorporate the DSM-5 document itself as subordinate legislation, but merely refers to it to clarify and standardise the definition of a ‘substance use disorder’ for the regulation as per section 165 of the Act.

The explanatory notes address this issue by providing the following justification:

The use of the DSM is justified because it provides a common language and standard criteria for the definition and classification of mental disorders, including substance use disorder, which are widely utilised and understood by practitioners within Australia who may become approved sponsors for work and development orders. The DSM has been the leading authoritative source for defining and classifying mental disorders for the purposes of diagnoses and treatment since it was first published in 1952 and is likely to remain so in the foreseeable future. Use of the DSM in the definition of substance use disorder is also consistent with definitions in other legislative instruments within the Queensland statute book and the approach adopted in Australian jurisdictions that have implemented work and development orders.9

By way of examples of precedent in Queensland, both the Civil Liability Regulation 2014 and the Workers’ Compensation and Rehabilitation Regulation 2014 define ‘mental disorder’ as a mental disorder recognised under DSM-4, or the fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, published by the American Psychiatric Association in 2000. The committee considers the potential risk to the institution of parliament, by defining a term in this amending regulation by way of an external document that is not incorporated by the legislation, is minimal.

The committee notes the explanatory notes comply with the requirements of the Legislative Standards Act 1992.

Recommendation

The committee recommends that the Legislative Assembly note this report. Linus Power MP

Chair

Economic and Governance Committee

Chair: Deputy Chair: Members:

Linus Power MP, Member for Logan
Ray Stevens MP, Member for Mermaid Beach Nikki Boyd MP, Member for Pine Rivers
Sam O’Connor MP, Member for Bonney
Dan Purdie MP, Member for Ninderry
Kim Richards MP, Member for Redlands

Contact details

Post Parliament House
Brisbane, Queensland, 4000

Email: egc@parliament.qld.gov.au Phone: 07 3553 6637
Web: www.parliament.qld.gov.au/egc

4

9 Explanatory notes, p 4.
Economics and Governance Committee

Appendix A – Commencement of provisions of the State Penalties Enforcement Amendment Act 2017

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Some extra interesting reading ……………

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=16&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=2ahUKEwjU-d_BhuXiAhVFjuYKHUmIBZA4ChAWMAV6BAgFEAI&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.parliament.nsw.gov.au%2Flcdocs%2Fother%2F11048%2FToll%2520Redress%2520-%2520Answers%2520to%2520questions%2520on%2520notice%2520-%2520Appendix%2520A%2520-%2520received%252029%2520June%25202017.pdf&usg=AOvVaw1zBXrXtA275o5FDzbpGlH-

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=15&ved=2ahUKEwjU-d_BhuXiAhVFjuYKHUmIBZA4ChAWMAR6BAgAEAI&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.qao.qld.gov.au%2Ffile%2F6811%2Fdownload%3Ftoken%3DDrR8lApV&usg=AOvVaw0Lc-TM1vB9_Zo0xnilLrh3

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